Race: “Giving good answers to the wrong questions”

So, I hope the book study, either on your own, or in groups is going well.  I have heard from some, as I do in most Lenten seasons, that these books just don’t “do it for them!”  No problem.  As I said, I hope you have found something that does “do it for you!”

I appreciate those of you who have commented and encourage more to do so on this blog so others will benefit from the wisdom you share.    Today, I thought we would look at page 175 and Aza Raskin, who has a different “twist” on computer technology, and multitasking, and even more what it means for us in life.

This quote especially on page 179:

He (Raskin) is not using some twentieth century measure to dictate how we use the twenty-first-century workplace.  It’s not our brain that’ the issue.  It the antiquated design of the workplace,  (I would encourage you to read “church”) and of even computers themselves.  Like Christian cathedrals built upon Roman ruins, the desktop is a remnant of an older culture that did not champion the values on which the World Wide Web is based: Interaction, collaboration, customizing, remixing, iteration, and reiteration.   “We often think we have solved the problem when we’ve merely come up with a good answer to the wrong question.”  Raskin insists.  He’s big on unlearning.  He calls it inspiration. 

This line especially, “We often think we have solved the problem when we’ve merely come up with a good answer to the wrong question.”  Raskin insists.  He’s big on unlearning.  He calls it inspiration. 

Think about this in relation to church, but even more in relation to our discussions of race.  In just this past week, we have the two Ferguson police officers shot, and the University of Oklahoma SAE scandal.  Do we really believe this only goes on in those places?  We would like to, that thought makes us feel better.

On the OU scandal, two articles caught my attention this week, thanks to some of you sending these around.   To me, these try to break through that quote above, “giving good answers to the wrong questions”

This first blog does just that, it states rather clearly that the way this has been handled, gets at the blunder of letting it be seen, leaked, revealed.   But it does little to work on the real problem.

http://mic.com/articles/112274/the-side-of-the-oklahoma-frat-story-that-nobody-is-talking-about

And then this one is the closest one I have seen to what might be a faithful and bold response.  The response that seems the most accepted everywhere is to cast the offenders into the abyss, to end the relationship for good.   There seems to be no path to reconciliation or learning, in relation to our discussion this Lent, relearning.   This article addresses that well.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/mariadixonhall/2015/03/a-teachable-moment-how-ou-failed-transformation-101/

What is the faithful Christian response?

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